Sayreville's 
LANDSCAPE

Situated within the New York metropolitan area, Sayreville looks much like any suburb in Middlesex County, or in New Jersey for that matter. Most of Sayreville’s homes were built after World War II on flattened tracts of land, and their architectural styles are repeated throughout surrounding communities. But buried within this seemingly ubiquitous landscape, mixed among a sea of curvilinear streets, cape cods, and split-levels, are remnants of a community which, for nearly a century, functioned in ways quite unlike the suburbs that have since engulfed it. Here, three village-like neighborhoods and a handful of very small, outlying neighborhoods thrived as a result of their interplay with two highly contingent and interdependent factors, one of which being industry, the other open space. 

Topographic Map, 1901
Topographic Map, 1901
Roads to Radford's Ferry, 1781
Roads to Radford's Ferry, 1781
Laurel Park, 1953
Laurel Park, 1953
Kearney's Point, 1960
Kearney's Point, 1960
The Roundabout, 1960
The Roundabout, 1960
Map of Sayreville, 1850
Map of Sayreville, 1850
Sale from Lenape to East Jersey
Sale from Lenape to East Jersey
Map of the Raritan River, 1685
Map of the Raritan River, 1685
Industrial Advertisement Map, 1970s
Industrial Advertisement Map, 1970s
Map of the Raritan River Railroad
Map of the Raritan River Railroad
Sayreville, 1876
Sayreville, 1876
Raritan River, 1706
Raritan River, 1706
Sayreville Clay Mining, 1904
Sayreville Clay Mining, 1904
Topographic Map, 1892
Topographic Map, 1892
Trolley Map
Trolley Map